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"Structural Racism & U.S. Homelessness: Why Ending Homelessness Requires a Racial Equity Approach"

Dr. Kelly Ray Knight from UC San Francisco and Dereck Paul from UC San Francisco
  • "Structural Racism & U.S. Homelessness: Why Ending Homelessness Requires a Racial Equity Approach"
  • 2020-06-24T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2020-06-24T13:00:00-07:00
  • Dr. Kelly Ray Knight from UC San Francisco and Dereck Paul from UC San Francisco
When
Jun 24, 2020 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
Webinar
Contact Name
Contact Phone
9164455161
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* In light of the concerns regarding COVID-19, this talk will be given as a webinar. *  

Structural Racism and U.S. Homelessness addresses the history of racial disparities in who experiences homelessness and  presents recent research on what underlies these disparities. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco Center for Vulnerable Populations have studied the role of structural racism in the life course of older adults experiencing homelessness     enrolled in the HOPE-HOME Study (Oakland, CA). Their recent paper presented a structural map of how various elements of structural racism, including criminal justice discrimination, employment discrimination, exposure to violence, premature death, and limited family wealth increased susceptibility to homelessness. This structural map elucidates areas for policy intervention and has been incorporated into policy planning by the Oakland/Berkeley/ Alameda County Continuum of Care Leadership Committee.

Kelly Ray Knight, PhD is a medical anthropologist and Associate Professor in the UCSF Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine and affiliated faculty with the Center for Knight PhotoVulnerable Populations at the Zuckerberg-San Francisco General Hospital and UCSF Global Health Sciences.  Her work centers on the experience of addiction in clinical and policy contexts, racialized health disparities, and health conditions produced or exacerbated by structural violence. Dr. Knight’s NIH-funded research explores the health, social and policy implications of homelessness in California and the consequences of reductions in opioid prescribing in safety net, primary health care settings.  She is a faculty lead for addiction medicine and structural competency medical education at UCSF School of Medicine. Dr. Knight’s award-wining ethnography, addicted.pregnant.poor (2015), is widely used to advocate for decreased stigma and increased services for women with substance use disorders who experience homelessness.

Dereck Paul is a 4th-year medical student at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. He studies the relationships between homelessness and health under his mentors at thePaul Photo UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations. He was named a 2018 Student National Medical Association David E. Satcher MD, PhD Health Disparities Research Fellow for his work mapping the role of structural racism in susceptibility to housing insecurity and homelessness. Outside of his studies and research, he writes about health policy, medical education, and the underrepresented medical trainee experience.

In light of the community concerns regarding COVID-19, this talk will be given as a webinar. The link will be provided on Tuesday, June 23rd to those that have registered by 5:00 pm on Monday, June 22nd.

Please click here to view the video.

Please click here to view the PowerPoint presentation.

Please click here for a print friendly flyer.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Useful links:

Reproductive (In)justice — Two Patients with Avoidable Poor Reproductive Outcomes

Racial discrimination in the life course of older adults experiencing homelessness: results from the HOPE HOME study

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