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California Climate Change Scoping Plan: The Role of Agriculture

Dennis Baldocchi* and Louise Jackson**, *Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley. **Professor in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.
  • California Climate Change Scoping Plan: The Role of Agriculture
  • 2016-05-26T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2016-05-26T13:30:00-07:00
  • Dennis Baldocchi* and Louise Jackson**, *Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley. **Professor in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.
When
May 26, 2016 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
916-445-5100
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UC Center Food and Agriculture Series (3 of 3)

“California Climate Change Scoping Plan: The Role of Agriculture”


The UC Center Food and Agriculture Series is a three week series brought to you through the collaboration of UCCS and the UC Global Food Initiative. The Global Food Initiative aligns the UC’s research to explore solutions to issues of food security, health and sustainability.

Moderated by Ann Thrupp, Executive Director, Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley


Professor Louise Jackson, UC Davis
Dr. Louise Jackson is Professor and Extension Specialist at the University of California,Davis. Her current research focuses on ecological intensification of agriculture in California and participatory processes for public involvement in managing agricultural landscapes, especially as relevant to climate change. She is engaged in translating research for policy at the regional, state and international levels.

 


Professor Dennis Baldocchi, UC Berkeley
Dr. Dennis Baldocchi is a Professor of Ecosystem Sciences in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at University of California Berkeley. Current work focuses on: 1) the roles of management and ecological restoration on greenhouse gas fluxes of crops and wetlands; 2) the impact of weather, climate trends and variability, physiological stress, and structure and function on the greenhouse gas fluxes of savanna woodlands and annual grasslands; and 3) the upscaling and interpretation of fluxes across climatic and ecological gradients with the AmeriFlux and FLUXNET networks.

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The views and opinions expressed during this lecture are those of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views of UCCS.

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