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“Marijuana Secondhand Smoke: The Return of a Familiar Problem and What it Means for Policymakers”

Matthew Springer Professor in the Division of Cardiology University of California, San Francisco
  • “Marijuana Secondhand Smoke: The Return of a Familiar Problem and What it Means for Policymakers”
  • 2016-04-21T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2016-04-21T13:00:00-07:00
  • Matthew Springer Professor in the Division of Cardiology University of California, San Francisco
When
Apr 21, 2016 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
916-445-5100
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“Marijuana Secondhand Smoke: The Return of a Familiar Problem and What it Means for Policymakers”

Matthew Springer

Professor in the Division of Cardiology

University of California, San Francisco

Despite public awareness that tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) is harmful, many people still assume that marijuana SHS is benign.  The issue of whether smoke-free laws should include marijuana is becoming more important as marijuana is legalized and the cannabis industry grows.  The lack of evidence for marijuana SHS causing acute cardiovascular harm is frequently mistaken for evidence that it is harmless, despite chemical and physical similarity between marijuana smoke and tobacco smoke.  However, there is emerging evidence that marijuana SHS exposure has adverse cardiovascular effects that are similar to, or worse than, those of tobacco SHS exposure.  This talk will cover what is known about the similarities and differences between SHS from tobacco and marijuana, how this should influence the crafting of smoke-free policies, and important holes in our knowledge that should be filled.

Dr. Matthew L. Springer received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley in 1985 and his PhD from Stanford University in 1992. He did postdoctoral research at Stanford and continued his research there as a senior scientist until joining the UCSF faculty in 2003, where he is currently one of two non-clinicians on the faculty of the Division of Cardiology. In addition to research interests that include cell therapy and gene therapy approaches to study and treat cardiovascular disease, Dr. Springer's laboratory is studying the cardiovascular effects of brief exposure to secondhand smoke from tobacco and marijuana and the related policy implications. He is a member of the UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.

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