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Is Demography Political Destiny? Population Change and California's Future Electorate

Mindy Romero, Founding Director of the California Civic Engagement Project, UC Davis Center for Regional Change
  • Is Demography Political Destiny? Population Change and California's Future Electorate
  • 2014-01-14T12:00:00-08:00
  • 2014-01-14T13:00:00-08:00
  • Mindy Romero, Founding Director of the California Civic Engagement Project, UC Davis Center for Regional Change
When
Jan 14, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-800)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
(916) 445-5100
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Post-analysis of the 2012 November election has drawn considerable discussion around the current and future  make-up of the electorate. Much of this attention has  focused on how future demographic shifts, particularly the expected growth of the non-white population, might impact the makeup of the electorate and, thus, potentially change both the nation’s and California’s  political landscape. A new policy brief from the California Civic Engagement Project (CCEP) will be released during this event. Mindy Romero, Director of the CCEP, will present the brief’s findings involving projected  changes in the future age and racial composition of U.S. and California voters through election year 2040. For California, continued high Latino and Asian population growth is projected to bring many more eligible voters, making these groups the fastest growing block of voters in the state. However, increases in these populations will vary significantly in magnitude and timeline across the state’s geography, meaning that strength of Latino and Asian voter growth will also vary across the state in the coming decades. This presentation will breakdown this sub-state geographic variation, highlighting hot spots of continued disparities in representation for these groups, as well as the locations (and timeline) where key thresholds of non-white voters are projected to develop. Projecting the extent and location of this demographic impact in California can help inform political expectations involving the coming non-white growth on a national stage, as well.

Mindy Romero is the founding director of the California Civic Engagement Project of the UC Davis Center for Regional Change. Her research has been cited in numerous major news outlets, including the Washington Post, LA Times, SF Chronicle, Politico and the Huffington Post.

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