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Immigrants and Public Transit Ridership

Evelyn Blumenberg, Ph.D, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs
When
Feb 23, 2012 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-800)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
530-752-2635
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Immigration has significantly affected transit use in California.  The enormous influx of immigrants to California has altered the demographics of transit commuting in the state and contributed importantly to a growth in transit ridership.  California immigrants commute by public transit at twice the rate of native-born commuters, comprise nearly 50 percent of all transit commuters, and are responsible for much of the growth in transit commuting.  However, with time in the U.S., immigrants’ reliance on public transit wanes.  Moreover, falling immigration rates translate into fewer new immigrants, those most likely to rely on public transit.  One way transit agencies can address the potential loss of immigrant riders is to better meet the needs of current immigrant transit users—perhaps by enhancing transit services in the dense urban neighborhoods that continue to serve as immigrant ports of entry.

Evelyn Blumenberg is a Professor of Urban Planning in the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs.  Professor Blumenberg's research examines the effects of urban structure—the spatial location of residents, employment, and services—on economic outcomes for low-wage workers, and on the role of planning and policy in shaping the spatial structure cities.  Her recent projects include analyses of the travel behavior of special population groups (immigrants, low-income, youth), the transportation expenditure burden, and the relationship between residential location and transportation among HUD housing voucher recipients.  Professor Blumenberg holds a bachelor's degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree and Ph.D. in urban planning from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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