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"What Americans Really Think About Climate Change - Attitude Formation and Change in Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy"

Jon Krosnick, Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences, Stanford University
  • "What Americans Really Think About Climate Change - Attitude Formation and Change in Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy"
  • 2015-11-12T12:00:00-08:00
  • 2015-11-12T13:00:00-08:00
  • Jon Krosnick, Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences, Stanford University
When
Nov 12, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-800)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
916-445-5100
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What Americans Really Think About Climate
Change - Attitude Formation and Change in
Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy
with
Jon Krosnick
Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences,
Stanford University


During the past decade, many natural scientists have been frustrated by the American public's apparent indifference to climate change and the lack of substantial government action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and transform America's energy economy. Headlines on newspapers across the country have proclaimed such things as: "Scientists and the American Public Disagree Sharply over Global Warming." One U.S. Senator has pronounced that the global warming issue is "dead" in the minds of Americans. And emissions reduction bills, such as Waxman-Markey, have been defeated in the Congress. Is it really true that Americans reject the opinions of natural scientists on climate change? And if not, what explains the lack of government action on the issue? In this presentation, Professor Krosnick will describe findings from a series of national surveys that he has designed and conducted since 1996, tracking what Americans do and do not believe on this issue and what they do and do not want to have done about it. Surprising results challenge many widely-held presumptions about public opinion, illuminate the increasing politicization of the issue, and help set the stage for understanding how future legislation on climate change may fare.
Jon Krosnick is Frederick O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, and Professor of Communication, Political Science, and Psychology at Stanford University, Director of Stanford’s Political Psychology Research Group, and Research Psychologist at the U.S. Census Bureau. He has expertise in questionnaire design and survey research methodology, voting behavior and elections, and American public opinion. He has taught courses for professionals on survey methods for 25 years around the world and has served as a methodology consultant to government agencies, commercial firms, and academic scholars. His recent research has focused on how other aspects of survey methodology (e.g., collecting data by interviewing face-to-face vs. by telephone or on paper questionnaires) can be optimized to maximize accuracy. He is a world-recognized expert on the psychology of attitudes, especially in the area of politics and co-principal investigator of the American National Election Study. For 30 years, Dr. Krosnick has studied how the American public's political attitudes are formed, change, and shape thinking and action. As an expert witness, he has evaluated surveys presented by opposing counsel and has conducted surveys to inform courts in cases involving unreimbursed expenses, uncompensated overtime work, exempt/non-exempt misclassification, patent/trademark violation, health effects of accidents, consequences of being misinformed about the results of standardized academic tests, economic valuation of environmental damage, change of venue motions, and other topics.

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