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Using WIC Data for Place-Based Research in Early Childhood Obesity: ......

May Wang, Professor of Community Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Using WIC Data for Place-Based Research in Early Childhood Obesity: ......
  • 2015-04-23T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2015-04-23T13:00:00-07:00
  • May Wang, Professor of Community Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
When
Apr 23, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
916-445-5100
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Using WIC Data for Place-Based Research in
Early Childhood Obesity: The Application
of with Systems Science Methods
May Wang
Professor of Community Health Sciences!
University of California, Los Angeles


Since 2002, the Special Supplemental Nutrition for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program in Los Angeles County (LAC) has maintained a unique database on participants, which includes height and weight measurements of WIC-participating children and the neighborhoods (census tracts) in which they live. Known as the Data Mining Project, this effort, funded by First 5 LA, has spurred a partnership among multiple organizations including the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, PHFE WIC, and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health – providing unique opportunities for place-based research. One specific opportunity is the application of systems science methods, such as agentbased modeling, to the evaluation of the impact of various community interventions and policies on early childhood obesity within diverse contextual settings. Preliminary findings from this study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, as well as uses of the Data Mining Project’s database for place-based research will be presented.

Dr. May Wang is currently a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA. Her research focuses on how family, school and neighborhood environments influence
child nutrition, growth and health. She is especially interested in addressing social disparities in child nutrition and the well-being of immigrant families from a global perspective, and in applying and developing new methodology for addressing the challenges of conducting obesity-related evaluation research. She is currently Principal Investigator of a five-year interdisciplinary study that is pioneering systems science methods to better understand what types of interventions are most effective in addressing child obesity within
various social contexts.

 

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