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Privacy in the Age of Social Media and Big Data

Paul Dourish, Professor of Informatics and Co-Director of the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, UC Irvine
  • Privacy in the Age of Social Media and Big Data
  • 2014-05-29T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2014-05-29T13:00:00-07:00
  • Paul Dourish, Professor of Informatics and Co-Director of the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, UC Irvine
When
May 29, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
(916) 445-5100
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Privacy and security have been inherent problems in digital information systems since day one. The first computer systems, after all, were military systems and enmeshed in security regulations. However, despite this long history, it seems that privacy is more of a concern than ever. New concerns over how we disclose information on social networking sites or how social media make us dangerously accessible to each other seem to surface every day. In this talk, Paul Dourish will address the topic of online privacy, and explore how we relate to each other in and around digital information.

Dourish is a Professor of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and Anthropology, and co-directs the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing. His research focuses primarily on understanding information technology as a site of social and cultural production; his work combines topics in human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, and science and technology studies. He has published over 100 scholarly articles, and was elected to the CHI Academy in 2008 in recognition of his contributions to Human-Computer Interaction. He is the author of two books: "Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction" (MIT Press, 2001), which explores how phenomenological accounts of action can provide an alternative to traditional cognitive analysis for understanding the embodied experience of interactive and computational systems; and, with Genevieve Bell, "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing" (MIT Press, 2011), which examines the social and cultural aspects of the ubiquitous computing research program.

Before coming to UCI, he was a Senior Member of Research Staff in the Computer Science Laboratory of Xerox PARC; he has also held research positions at Apple Computer and at Rank Xerox EuroPARC. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University College, London, and a B.Sc. (Hons) in Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science from the University of Edinburgh.

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