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Is there a Public Interest in Payment? Bitcoin and Beyond

Bill Maurer, Dean, School of Social Sciences; Director, Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion; Co-Director, Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, UC Irvine
  • Is there a Public Interest in Payment? Bitcoin and Beyond
  • 2014-08-14T12:00:00-07:00
  • 2014-08-14T13:00:00-07:00
  • Bill Maurer, Dean, School of Social Sciences; Director, Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion; Co-Director, Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, UC Irvine
When
Aug 14, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
(916) 445-5100
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Innovations in the payments industry, from mobile banking to Bitcoin, are leading to regulatory puzzles and not a little consumer confusion. And the business is heating up, with a host of new entrants adding to the payments landscape and non-bank operators getting into the money business. This talk outlines some recent developments as well as some caution signs as new services create closed payment communities, with implications for public policy, and for the very idea of money itself.

Bill Maurer is a cultural anthropologist who conducts research on law, property, money, and finance, focusing on the technological infrastructures and social relations of exchange and payment. He has particular expertise in emerging, alternative and experimental forms of money and finance, payment technologies, and their legal implications. He has published on topics ranging from offshore financial services to mobile phone-enabled money transfers, Islamic finance, alternative currencies, and the future of money. He is founding director of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and co-director of the Intel Science and Technology Center in Social Computing. He has worked as a consultant in industry and the non-profit and philanthropic sector, and has also provided expert testimony on his areas of expertise. He serves as a member of several journal editorial boards and has been involved in curatorial work directly associated with his research, represented most recently in an ongoing exhibit on the past, present and future of money at the British Museum. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1994.

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