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Improving the Design of Local Solar Programs: A Case Study of Los Angeles

J.R. DeShazo, UCLA, Luskin Center for Innovation
When
Jun 30, 2011 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM (America/Los_Angeles / UTC-700)
Where
1130 K Street, Room LL3
Contact Name
Contact Phone
916-445-5100
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In the search for clean energy solutions, new public policies are creating incentives for solar energy throughout California. J.R. DeShazo, Director of the Luskin Center for Innovation, will discuss his high-profile solar policy study that provides data on the potential impact that regional solar power policies can have on Los Angeles’ renewable power sources. Specifically, his analysis of rooftop solar potential in Los Angeles. Los Angeles is endowed not only with bountiful sunshine, but also with vast expanses of low-rise urban development that offers valuable sitting opportunities for distributed solar energy generation. In addition, DeShazo will give a brief overview of his recent solar Feed-In Tariff research which resulted in Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s release of a long-term, comprehensive solar plan, including a proposal for a solar Feed-in Tariff program administered by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power.  The information may prove useful for economic development planners, solar photovoltaic (PV) installers, utility planners, building owners, public administrators, labor union leadership, and anyone interested in the development of solar power in California.

J.R. DeShazo is the Director of the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation and the Lewis Center for Regional Studies at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is an Associate Professor and Co-Chair of the Department of Public Policy in the School of Public Affairs at UCLA (B.A., College of William and Mary, M.Sc., Oxford University, Rhodes Scholar; Ph.D., Harvard University). He was a faculty associate at the Harvard Institute for International Development (1997-2000).

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